Dificulty > Complex

Simple methods are easy to use (for example), require shorter period of time (eg. Bodymaping), and use a small amount of material (Path to Participation). However, you can collect lots of information (Questionnaire, Communication Mapping), develop a lot of ideas (Brainstorming, Six Thinking Hats), discuss your ideas (Focus Groups) select ideas with potential (Affinity Diagram) or on a simple way present your service (Lego Serious Play, Prototyping) or verify your service with potential users (Service Prototype).

On other hand, Complex methods require extra preparation before actual release; then, very often more people has to be involved or require a lot of different materials to be used or method delivery require longer period (User Diaries, Service Safari). However, with these methods you will be ale to collect richer data about the user (Video Ethnography, Day in a life, Empathy Tools) get more detail understanding service process (Actors Map, Process Analysis, System Map), relationships between people involved in service design (User Journey) or verify your new proposed service (Experience Survey, Offering Map).

Experience Surveying

Published on November 26, 2018 by in , ,

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In order to measure the difference between expectation and experience, administer two identical surveys – one to measure users’ expectations of service quality within a generic sector, and one to measure users’ actual experiences of service quality for a specific organisation. Analysing the gaps between the two leads to insight and opportunities. The trick (as […]

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Offering Map

Published on November 25, 2018 by in , , ,

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There is no standard format for this tool: the offering could be described in words or could be illustrated by images, but most frequently it is visualised through a graph. This instrument could support the elaboration of the service idea as well the development of some specific solutions. It could be a tool for the […]

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Storyboards often focus on a main character whom the audience will follow through the service, but the most important thing is to tell a story about how the service works. Use your service blueprint as a starting point, and think about explaining it in a story format. You will need to think about who your […]

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Fresh Eyes

Published on November 21, 2018 by in , ,

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First, define the problem or issue. Then, randomly select alternative viewpoints and predict how people might respond to the following questions: What would be important to them here? What aspect of the topic would they focus on? What ideas and approaches might they have? Reflect on the possible responses and ask/challenge yourself Might this work […]

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Provocation

Published on November 20, 2018 by in , ,

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Verbally express an extreme or outrageous scenario that would necessitate completely redefining how you approach an issue. Then, select the ‘simple rule’ that seems to be central to the way people currently think about the issue. Eliminate or drastically modify these elements in a scenario that describes a new situation and makes it seem real. Be […]

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That is Impossible!

Published on November 19, 2018 by in , ,

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Make a list of things that are currently widely accepted as being impossible, eg It is impossible to… …get laboratory results instantly …know if a patient is going to turn up for an appointment until they actually present at reception …get someone home exactly when we plan to For each item on the list, have […]

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The service concept is described by representing all the different touchpoints through realistic images that make them visible and give a quick idea of how the service will work, how it will be perceived and how it will improve the user experience. Example: Health Connect is a future service concept designed to improve access to […]

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Service Image

Published on November 13, 2018 by in , , ,

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The Service Image aims to support the dialogue with stakeholders and provide a vision of the service. It also supports the discussion around concepts, eliciting prompt responses to the prominent aspects of every idea. The picture uses a simple visual language to illustrate a possible situation in the use of the service; using overlapping sketches […]

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Poster

Published on November 12, 2018 by in , ,

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Through the creative elaboration of the poster you can imagine how the new service could be launched on the market and perceived by users. The design activity gives the opportunity to understand the link between the service idea and the existing reality. On the other hand, it could be an effective way of visualising the […]

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Issue cards

Published on October 15, 2018 by in , ,

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Each card could contain an insight, a picture, a drawing or a description. Everyone is able to suggest new interpretations of the problem and to induce the assumption of a different point of view. For example of the card see photo above or visit Service Design Tool website.

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Create your blueprint on a large piece of paper or a wall. Map out all the main stages of the service journey as headings and use them as a guide. Start at the beginning of the service journey and imagine all the interactions and touchpoints which the user will encounter. Write these on post-it notes; […]

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Scenarios are imaginative stories that can be presented through a variety of media including texts, illustrated storyboards, videos, film, or short plays and can feature multiple characters to describe different service interactions. To create an effective scenario, first define a set of characters who will use the product or service you are designing. Consider the […]

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Coming up with innovative ideas for every possible situation and every possible customer can be extremely challenging. That’s when the DSB tool can help you. During a DSB session use a set of cards that depict a wide range of service moments (eg patient waiting in waiting room) and personas (eg consultant, special diabetes nurse). By […]

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A Persona is a character which is created to represent user research in an easily understandable way. Each persona should bring together lots of information about similar people into one character that represents a group of users. Personas can include the following useful information: name, age, occupation, where personas live, what personas do in their […]

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