Dificulty > Simple

Simple methods are easy to use (for example), require shorter period of time (eg. Bodymaping), and use a small amount of material (Path to Participation). However, you can collect lots of information (Questionnaire, Communication Mapping), develop a lot of ideas (Brainstorming, Six Thinking Hats), discuss your ideas (Focus Groups) select ideas with potential (Affinity Diagram) or on a simple way present your service (Lego Serious Play, Prototyping) or verify your service with potential users (Service Prototype).

On other hand, Complex methods require extra preparation before actual release; then, very often more people has to be involved or require a lot of different materials to be used or method delivery require longer period (User Diaries, Service Safari). However, with these methods you will be ale to collect richer data about the user (Video Ethnography, Day in a life, Empathy Tools) get more detail understanding service process (Actors Map, Process Analysis, System Map), relationships between people involved in service design (User Journey) or verify your new proposed service (Experience Survey, Offering Map).

Brainstorming

Published on November 22, 2018 by in , ,

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You should first establish the purpose and topic of the brainstorming session. Everyone in the group then calls out their ideas spontaneously and writes them down to be analysed later. Follow the five key rules of brainstorming: All ideas are acceptable; judgement is ruled out until the process is complete Freewheeling is welcome: the wilder […]

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Six Thinking Hats

Published on November 16, 2018 by in , ,

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Someone in the group ‘puts on’ the blue hat to become the session leader. The wearer of the blue hat will then agree with other group members on the most useful order of hats to use, and will coordinate their subsequent use, keeping a check on time. Note that the colours of the hats naturally carry […]

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Affinity Diagram

Published on November 15, 2018 by in , , ,

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You can do this design activity in the following way: firstly, phrase the issue under discussion in a full sentence e.g. ‘Why are patients waiting so long for test results?’ and participants then silently record their responses on post-it notes. As a minimum, they should use a noun and a verb; ideally there should be four […]

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Elements are used to represent the service components and to better explain an idea to other members of the team. Prototyping is a design activity supporting the visualisation of ideas and a way to ensure that all the members of the team are talking about the same thing. It also contributes to making the process […]

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This realistic simulation is certainly one of the best ways for visualising human behaviour and for sharing even its least describable qualities with the specific recipients. The prototypes could be a physical model of a specific touchpoint, a sketch or a sign. It could also be a role-play which focuses on the service’s interactions. The […]

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Clustering and Voting

Published on October 12, 2018 by in , , ,

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To form a cluster, write all ideas on post-it notes first, then place similar ideas in groups on a large sheet of paper. Then name each group and take a photo of your clustered ideas to record how they were grouped. For voting, give participants a certain number and distinctive type of stickers (eg 5 […]

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Popcorn Ideas

Published on October 11, 2018 by in , , , ,

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Someone starts with describing his/her idea on a chosen challenge: ideas need to be expressed quickly and succinctly. As the first person finishes, call the next person and when the next perso n finishes, that person then calls another one, and so on. Subsequent participants should not choose same or similar ideas as previous participants; […]

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Focus Groups

Published on October 9, 2018 by in , , , ,

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The correct selection of focus group participants is critical as group dynamics play a key role, as some participants may be empowered, other intimidated. Focus groups can take a great deal of time and energy to organise, but for the inclusive design process it can offer fresh insights for design researchers as well as generate […]

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The Path to Participation normally takes the form of a series of moments which are drawn as a process.  This design activity can visualise different levels from an operational point of view to a representation of the customer journey. Therefore a well-designed service will consider all paths to participation. The path to participation mapping process […]

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This is a simple exercise in imagining a service experience using small, hand sized toys. To represent the users’ story you will need some of the following LEGO figures:  user, a member of staff, an environment and some paper touchpoints (see an example in the photo above). You literally walk through the service moments, taking […]

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User Forum

Published on October 1, 2018 by in , , , ,

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This design activity provides a space for users to engage with the creative process and it could be used throughout the duration of a project. The activity does not require a trained moderator and can therefore be medical worker-led, extending the boundaries of the traditional focus group format. User forums can be used to explore […]

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Questionnaire

Published on September 30, 2018 by in , , ,

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A list of questions could be posted or emailed to people to capture their responses to a range of subjects or issues. This method can provide both qualitative and quantitative information to enable a comparison of responses. Questionnaires should be as visually clear and inviting as possible. Generally, there are three types of questions: open […]

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Bodymapping

Published on September 22, 2018 by in , , , ,

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Using anonymous “bodymaps” makes it safer and easier for people to contribute. On large sheets of paper draw outlines of a person (around a volunteer, if the paper is big enough) and stick these to the wall, table or floor. Participants then explain what bothers them about living with a condition to the facilitator, who […]

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On a big sheet of paper draw 5 concentric circles starting with the smallest in the middle of the paper and finishing with the largest one nearest the edge of the paper. Put the ‘subject’ of your study inside the smallest circle then, working outwards, indicate how often communications occur e.g. rarely, monthly, weekly or […]

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